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Negotiating Terrain

The first rule is this:
If you do not feel comfortable negotiating an obstacle then stop!

If possible, get on the CB radio and tell the vehicle behind you to pass. Watch them traverse the obstacle and/or ask for a spot.

Hill climbing tips

The two problems associated with steep slopes – namely gradient and grip – are usually reduced with a Land Rover. Land Rover products have the power and appropriate gearing to climb a continuous slope of nearly 45°… if the grip is there!

Here are some tips:

  • Travel straight up or down a hill or grade.
  • Hill descents; first look at your route. Choose a route without large boulders or holes. Keep your truck in 1st gear, low range and with the center diff lock engaged. Keep your feet off the foot peddles. Engine braking should be enough. If you have a Rover with Hill Descent control engage it, let it do the breaking. If absolutely necessary to break for some reason. Do it slowly and methodically. Do not use the hand break. It works on the drive train and could cause transmission problems.

Some additional tips

  • Cross obstacles at a 35 to 45 degree angle, one wheel at a time. With solid axle vehicles, this will raise the front improving approach angle some what.
  • Don’t straddle large rocks. Remember there are steering and drive train components under your vehicle that could be damaged and leave you stranded
  • Avoid mud if you can while remaining on the road or trail. If you start to bog down and start to loose traction, turn your steering well rapidly from side to side.
  • Turn into ravines or large depressions at about a 45-degree angle
  • Straddle ruts , even if they are wider than your vehicle. This will keep your vehicle level and safely on the trail or road.
  • Remember it’s illegal to cross waterways in some areas. If you do cross, cross streams at fording points only. Cross slowly and at a 90-degree angle to the stream if possible. In deeper water, go just fast enough to “plow” a small bow wave in front of your vehicle.

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