• Barbara Toy, an Early Land Rover Heroine
    Just like the Land Rover broke down barriers, Barbara Toy did too, taking some of the first extremely long-range expeditions with the new Series I Land Rover in the early 1950s. A woman traveling solo, she took her truck, Pollyanna, around the world, focusing often on the deserts of North Africa and the Middle East. […]
  • The Armored Range Rover Sentinel Brings Style to Security
    Perhaps you're an oil baron, railroad magnate, or high-level mobster, susceptible at any time of day or night to ambush or attack. You need a safe vehicle, but you also want a bit more style than a pedestrian armored Suburban. Enter the Range Rover Sentinel, the 10,000-pound armored behemoth for those who legitimately need to […]
  • Land Rover Execs Drop Hints on New Defender
    The new Defender will be very different from the old one. This has been common knowledge for years. Land Rover has stated it over and over, to try and deaden the blow to old school Land Rover enthusiasts. Several Land Rover executives have now detailed a few ways that the new truck will be the […]
  • A History of Discovery, Part 2: 2005-2019
    To celebrate the 30th anniversary of the Discovery, and its 25th anniversary in North America, we continue our History of Discovery, picking up in the early 2000s with the launch of the Discovery 3/LR3 and continuing through Discovery 4/LR4 and the current Discovery 5.  

Tread Lightly!

The following tips are from Tread Lightly!‘s website. Tread Lightly! is an organization who promotes responsible off-highway vehicle use.

General tips

  • Stay on routes designated for four wheeling.
  • Cross streams only at designated fording points, or where the road crosses the stream.
  • Cross large rocks and other obstacles slowly, at an angle, one wheel at a time.
  • Avoid muddy trails. Leave them for another day when they’re dry. If you do come across mud on the trail, go easy on the gas to avoid wheel spin, which can cause rutting. Don’t leave the trail to avoid muddy spots, this can widen the trail and damage trailside plant-life.
  • Straddle ruts, gullies and washouts even if they are wider than your vehicle.
  • Don’t turn around on narrow roads, steep terrain, or unstable ground. Backup until you find a safe place to turn around.
  • Travel straight up or down hills. Don’t traverse the face of a hill; you may slip sideways or roll your vehicle.
  • Stop frequently and reconnoiter ahead on foot.
  • Ride in the middle of trails to minimize widening them. Avoid side-slipping and wheel spin, which can lead to erosion.
  • To help with traction, balance your load and lower tire pressure to where you see a bulge (typically not less the than 20 pounds).
  • Know where the differential or lowest point on the vehicle is.
  • Choose the appropriate winch for your vehicle size.
  • Attach towing cable, tree strap or chain as low as possible to the object being winched. Let the winch do the work; never drive the winch.
  • Protect the soundscape by avoiding unnecessary noise created by your vehicle.
  • Leave gates as you find them. Respect private land.
  • Yield the right-of-way to those passing you or traveling uphill. Yield to mountain bikers, hikers, and horses.
  • Avoid “spooking” livestock and wildlife.
  • Always avoid sensitive habitats: wetlands, meadows, and tundra.
  • Following a ride, wash your vehicle to reduce the spread of invasive species.
  • Motorized and mechanized vehicles are not allowed in areas designated “Wilderness.”
  • Pack out what you pack in. Carry a trash bag in your vehicle and pick up litter left by others.

When camping

  • Whenever possible, use existing campsites. Camp on durable surfaces and place tents on a non-vegetated area. Do not dig trenches around tents.
  • Camp a least 200 feet from water, trails and other campsites.
  • Minimize use of fire. For cooking, try using a camp stove.

Before you go

  • Contact the land manager for area restrictions, closures, and permit requirements. If you cross private property, be sure to ask permission from the landowner(s).
  • Get a map.
  • Make a realistic plan and stick to it. Always tell someone where you are going and your expected return time.
  • Check the weather forecast.
  • Make sure your vehicle is mechanically up to task. Be prepared with tools, supplies and spares for trailside repairs.
  • Travel with a group of two or more vehicles, as riding solo can leave you vulnerable if you have an accident or breakdown. Designate meeting areas in case of separation.